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Post Precious Premiere Pop Track ‘Lose Yourself’

With their debut single “Timebomb,” Post Precious achieved that rare and electric pop music accomplishment: They created a song that both propels you to the dance floor while simultaneously hitting you right in the feels. This kind of music isn’t really a genre (although it’s often referred to as pensive pop or as melancholic bangers), but it’s something that Post Precious seem to be able to achieve with ease.

Alt-pop singer Alex Winston and MS MR’s Max Hershenowformed Post Preciouswhile they were writing music for other artists. They soon realized that the collaborativematerial was just too good to give away. Tired of constrictions of traditional release structures, record deals, and the power plays in the music industry, they decided to release the music independently without the aid of a record label. The music is no less ambitious because of this, though; it’s pure euphoric pop with a dark underbelly.

“In a lot of ways, dance music feels like it’s trying to physicalize an emotional experience,” Post Precious said in an email to INTO. “The melancholy of these big heartfelt songs lends itself really well to that sense of anticipation and release, while simultaneously smoothing over moments that might feel sort of self-indulgent in, say, a piano ballad.”

Their second single, “Lose Myself,” which INTO is premiering below, continues in this trajectory. Brought together by pulsing electronics, beats, and strings, the song, co-written by Ryn Weaver, delves into the complicated process of avoiding getting lost in the dank and enticing caves of jealousy.

“[‘Lose Myself’] is about that sinking feeling of seeing an old flame happy with someone new. Like every song we write, this one is a collection of our individual experiences, and in this case, the experiences of our co-writer, the amazing singer Ryn Weaver,” the group said.

For Hershenow, the themes are pretty universal. “I wish I could say I had the emotional maturity to be genuinely and completely happy for my exes when I see them with someone new, but I think there will always be a tinge of regret,” he said.

“Anyone that says otherwise is a liar!” added Winston. “So much of our identity is wrapped up in ego and validation from others, that I think regardless of how things may have ended, we sometimes subconsciously romanticize that experience when we see that an ex has moved on.”