Yung Miami’s Homophobic Comments Just Cost City Girls Their Gay Ass Fanbase

In late August, Yung Miami of City Girls fame became yet another celebrity caught up in the rapture of old tweets coming back to haunt them. In the rapper’s case, the offensive tweets related to her comments that if she realized her son were gay, she would beat the shit out of them. The sentiment itself is troubling enough to garner condemnation, but in Yung Miami’s case, it was particularly puzzling because Black gay men have played a pivotal role in the rap duo’s quick ascension.

For at least a year now, it has been extremely difficult to find a brunch populated by Black gay men that did not include someone quoting their infamous “PERIOD!” over and over again as the rest of the table follows by reciting several of their favorite lyrics from their very lit ass mixtape. And while gay Black men are not solely responsible for City Girls becoming the southern fried steak version of Salt ‘N Pepa, but as with most things in pop culture, Black gays been on (bitch, you been con). Needless to say, the Trina acolyte named Caresha has her damn nerve saying she would abuse her son for being gay while happily benefitting from our support.

Her label, Quality Control, however, knew she fucked up, and henceforth issued an apology.

“I understand how it can be seen as offensive to the LGBTQ community,” her post said. “I also realize how insensitive my comments were to my fans and followers … my deepest apologies and heart goes out to those who have seen that tweet and were offended.”

Did I believe she wrote this? Hardy har (no), but I took it as a gesture from an artist (or at least her handlers) realizing a part of their fan base has been offended. Some didn’t accept her apology, but a lot of us were willing to move on so long as Yung Miami could keep her opinions to herself, and ideally, go read something. In doing so, we could bop to their music and say “#FreeJT” without feeling like a sucker.

We were doing so good, y’all! Their debut album, Girl Code, is due on Friday. Their first single “Twerk” samples No Limit rapper Choppa’s “Choppa Style,” which I used to dance to at the Black gay clubs. I would dance like I had no self respect, which speaks to the spirit of the track. Their sample of it is so good; it made me more excited to hear the album. I need thot bops to help me cope with living in Trump’s America.

And then Yung Miami appeared on The Breakfast Club and decided to light her Instagram press release on fire as she double downed on the dumb and forced me to revisit what I tried to move past for the sake of my gym/life playlists.

Charlamagne Tha God asked about her those controversial tweets and all she had to do was go back to her ghostwritten apology. Instead, she made clear that she didn’t write or mean the apology released in her name.

“I didn’t tweet nothing about [the LGBTQ community],” she said. “I was just talking about my son. I just said that if I saw anything gay in my son, that I would beat him.”

Exposing an insatiable taste for her pedicure, Yung Miami continued, explaining that folks merely took her comment the wrong way.

She offered the following: “But that’s just like when your mama tells you, ‘If you break my table I’m gonna beat the shit out of you.’ That don’t mean she’s gonna beat the shit out of you, she’s just saying it.”

Well, Mama is saying it because she finds your behavior problematic. So Yung Miami is saying that she likens being gay to bad behavior, thus, if not wanting to literally beat the shit out of you, would at least like to convey the sentiment verbally in order to make her disapproval crystal clear. Period (and shit).

If you’re not done rolling your eyes yet, we’ve still got the part where she acts like someone’s racist aunt who says she’s not racist but would have a problem with her child dating “one of those people.”

Indeed: “I have absolutely nothing against gay people, but I wouldn’t want my son to be gay,” she explained. “I’m around a lot of gay people all of the time; my stylist is gay, my cousin is gay.”

Yung Miami was recently around a whole bunch of Black gay men given she was booked to perform at a party populated by a whole lot of us less than two months ago. Our money was good enough to help feed her and her son, but that doesn’t make us good enough in her eyes apparently.

Yung Miami, like a lot of people who harbor prejudices, always likes to claim it’s all good until it impacts someone close to her. She says she doesn’t understand why people are offended and that’s largely rooted in her underlying sentiment that the kind of people offended are less than and unworthy of real consideration. (It’s also ‘cause she’s ignorant.)

I am a fan of their music, but I will not be rushing to hear Girl Code. And I hope that the gay party promoters who have booked City Girls recently reflect on future bookings because unless she truly understands the danger of her words, why throw dollars at someone who ultimately demeans us?

As the son of a mother who did not want me to be gay, I worry about her son. My mom has never wanted to physically harm me over what I cannot help, but you live with a pain all the same.

In sum, I really, really wish Yung Miami had just sat there and kept her intolerance to herself. Their music is supposed to be entertaining and escapist.

Now her goofy ass has ruined it.

Header image via Getty


Michael Arceneaux

Michael Arceneaux writes the “Dearly Beloved” advice column at INTO. He is the New York Times bestselling author of the newly released I Can't Date Jesus from 37 Ink/Atria Books/Simon & Schuster. His work has appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, Rolling Stone, Essence, The Guardian, Mic, and more. Follow him on Twitter.

in case you missed it