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Accused Pedophile Thinks Sexual Assault Allegations Against Brett Kavanaugh Are Bogus

One could say Brett Kavanaugh was asking for it.

Although the Supreme Court nominee did not seek Roy Moore’s endorsement after decades-old allegations of sexual assault resurfaced earlier this week, the former Alabama judge has come out to defend him anyway. In a statement released Thursday, the 73-year-old said the “suspect” claims are an illustration of the “depths to which liberals will stoop to stop opposition to their agenda.”

“Brett Kavanaugh, like me, has withstood numerous investigations and vetting by the most rigorous legal and political authorities,” he said.

Moore sees a number of parallels between his and Kavanaugh’s cases.

After he won the GOP nomination to replace Attorney General Jeff Sessions in the U.S. Senate, nine women came forward to allege sexual misconduct dating back to Moore’s days as a district attorney in the 1970s. Some of the accusers were as young as 14 at the time of the alleged incidents.

The noted anti-LGBTQ bigot subsequently lost the Senate race to Democrat Doug Jones after leading by double digits prior to the allegations.

After being defeated by 1.7 points in the November special elections, Moore thinks the assault claims brought to light by Palo Alto University Professor Christine Blasey Ford are merely “tactics” to stonewall Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court.

In an interview with the Washington Post, the 51-year-old lecturer claimed Kavanaugh accosted her during a during a high school party in the early 1980s. As she was heading to the bathroom, Ford alleged he shoved her into a bedroom, pinned her down, groped her, and attempted to tear off her clothes. When she tried to scream for help, Ford claimed Kavanaugh put his hand over her mouth.

Ford escaped when a friend allegedly discovered the pair in bed and leaped on top of them, allowing her to run away.

Kavanaugh has denied the report.

“This is a completely false allegation,” the former D.C. circuit court judge claimed in a statement issued by the White House. “I have never done anything like what the accuser describes — to her or to anyone.”

Moore said Republicans need to ensure history doesn’t repeat itself in allowing the claims to derail Kavanaugh’s confirmation to SCOTUS.

“They know what’s happening,” he told the conservative outlet One News Network. “It’s so obvious that these tactics are used just days before a very important event … but these come up right before an election or a confirmation, and I think the Republicans need to take a stand.”

Moore, who was ousted from the Alabama Supreme Court after attempting to block same-sex marriages, said liberals resort to these methods “because [they’re] effective.”

“They know that on the one hand, you offend women if you believe somebody that says they weren’t guilty of sexual misconduct,” he said. “On the other hand, if you don’t believe them, you’re condemning the person accused of guilt to prove his own innocence. It’s a Catch-22.”

But what Moore neglected to mention is that he and Kavanaugh have another thing in common: The claims are supported by decades of evidence.

The nine allegations of sexual assault against Moore were each corroborated by numerous sources, while notes from Ford’s therapist dating back to 2012 describe the Kavanaugh incident as a “rape attempt.” The accuser also voluntarily submitted to a polygraph test, which she passed.

More than 60 LGBTQ organizations have called on the Senate to postpone Kavanaugh’s confirmation hearing until the Federal Bureau of Investigations can vet the allegations.

Queer and trans advocates have furthermore opposed the conservative judge’s nomination, claiming his presence on the Supreme Court would be a “direct threat” to LGBTQ rights. Citing his “troublingly lengthy far-right pedigree,” the Human Rights Campaign claimed “he was hand-picked by anti-LGBTQ, anti-choice groups in an explicit effort to undermine equality.”

LGBTQ rights groups have fought to release records from his three-year stint as White House Staff Secretary under George W. Bush, when the federal government pursued a constitutional amendment banning marriage equality.

Those records have yet to be made public.

Image via Getty


Nico Lang

Nico Lang is a staff writer for INTO, covering news, politics, and global LGBTQ issues.