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Object As Subject's 'Permission' Is Queer Feminist Magic

A trained classical violinist turned singer, Paris Hurley leads the LA-based art-punk outfit Object as Subject on the new politically-tinged album Permission. With Hurley’s vocals ruminating over percussion from Hole drummer Patty Schemel, bass and backup vocals from Gina Young (Team Gina), and live choreography from Emilia “Pony Sweat” Richeson, Permission is a modern iteration of riot grrrl; queer radical lyrical feminism.
 
“This record is a permission slip to my deepest self, granting her all the allowance and approval she needs to take up space within her own life,” Hurley tells INTO. “It is a ritualistic destruction of the long-held myth that my existence, my talent, my joy, my magic, my anger, my brilliance, my desires, and my voice are harmful to others unless used entirely in service of their needs, ideas or dreams. It is a practice of unlearning. It is the permission to be loud, to set my own boundaries, to invest in my dreams, to powerfully see vs. passively exist to be looked at, to own my erotic energy without shutting it down on behalf of what others might do with it, and to take up a whole record’s worth of space with my voice and ideas. It is a practice of granting myself permission to become more of myself in every moment and it is the permission to be unapologetic about all of it.”
 
 
Hurley describes Permission as a feminist, queer, and magical space, and songs like “Weaponry” and “Sinner” speak to the idea of “permission” as something both requested and required, but also negated when it comes to patriarchal and societal ideas about women and other marginalized people.
 
“I deeply believe in what we are creating and want folks to have an inroad to the practices, values, and rituals behind our work.,” Hurley says. “Women being loud and taking up space is a feminist act. Women making space for each other’s voices + bodies + power is a feminist act. Making + living by your own definitions is a feminist act. Practicing permission as consent, permission as access to your own power, and permission as a way to show up for others is a feminist act.”
 
Object as Subject sees the 11-track LP as an invitation “to turn inward. To face yourself. To free yourself. To save yourself,” Hurley says. “To be loud. To revel in your joy. To feel your sorrow. To sweat out your fears. To scream your anger. To practice showing up for yourself, to take this strength into your daily actions + choices, and to practice showing up for others.”
 
“Permission is a ritual. A practice. An offering,” Hurley says, launching into further ruminations. “It is the permission to wear a crop top. It is the permission to say no to an invitation that will drain you. It is the permission to dance. It is the permission to experience joy. It is the permission to believe you are worthy of financial stability. It is the permission to exist beyond your addictions. It is the permission to feel your feelings. It is the permission to exist outside of your pain. It is the permission to love your body. It is the permission to advocate for yourself. It is the permission to be great at things. It is the permission to want. It is the permission to ask questions. It is the permission to challenge authority. It is the permission to set your own boundaries. It is the permission to question your belief in God. It is the permission to play. It is the permission to go back to school as an adult. It is the permission to move at your own pace. It is the permission to trust yourself. It is the permission to explore your sexuality. It is the permission to take care of yourself. It is the permission to let your leg hair grow. It is the permission to wear lipstick. It is the permission to change. It is the permission to dream.”
 
Listen to Permission below and grab a copy when it releases Friday, online, in stores and at the release party at El Cid in Los Angeles.
 
 

 


Trish Bendix

Trish Bendix is the Managing Editor of INTO.

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